Last edited by Tojalabar
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil found in the catalog.

Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil

The Islands That Roofed the World

by Mary Whithall

  • 364 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Luath Press Limited .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Construction & heavy industry,
  • Local history,
  • Mining industry,
  • Gardening/Plants,
  • Gardening,
  • History - General History,
  • Scotland,
  • Western Isles, Outer Hebrides,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Cultural Region/British Isles,
  • History / General History,
  • History / Great Britain,
  • Essays

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8450511M
    ISBN 100946487766
    ISBN 109780946487769

    The Slate Islands lie off the west coast of Argyll. Slate has been taken from these shores from their earliest recorded history and the richness and quality of the deposits meant that in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries slate quarrying was one of the most important industries in Breadalbane family owned the land of Easdale and its surrounds for over years and of course. I have seen two versions of the island's name: Bal na Uamh (the place of the cave), and Bal na Uaigh (the place of the tomb). These names make me wonder what was here before they started carving away all the slate. For an excellent description of these islands see Mary Withall's Easdale, Belnahua, Luing & Seil: The Islands that Roofed the World.

    You can explore the surrounding waters on SeaFari’s fast RIBs or with Sealife Adventures, or simply take the passenger ferry to Easdale or the car ferry to Luing. A Brief Journey Through Seil Arriving on Seil you can watch the tide rushing under the famous Bridge Over The Atlantic as you enjoy a refreshment outside the pub, the Tigh an Truish. Cost £ payable on the return journey. Crossing takes approx 3 minutes (Crossings marked * must be booked with 24hrs notice) SUMMER: Easter – October 31st Monday to Saturday * (not Sat);

      The Slate Islands lie off the west coast of Argyll. Slate has been taken from these shores from their earliest recorded history and the richness and quality of the deposits meant that in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries slate quarrying was one of the most important industries in Breadalbane family owned the land of Easdale and its surrounds for over /5(12). Seil and Luing Circumnavigation July The fickle forecast! It changed all week, jumping from OK to marginal to definitely not OK and back again. The fickle forecast! Checked another forecast and it predicted a lovely weekend. The fickle forecast! Checked a third forecast hoping for a majority vote and different yet again.


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Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil by Mary Whithall Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book is fairly brief but, written by the Easdale Folk museum archivist, its packed with information about the slate islands off the west coast of Scotland (Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil).Chapters cover The Geology of the Slate Islands; The Slate Industry and the Breadalbanes; Winning the Slate; Housing; Public Health; Religion in Netherlorn; Communications; Food, Agriculture /5(8).

Buy The Islands that Roofed the World: Easdale, Seil, Luing and Belnahua by Mary Withall (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low /5(8). The Islands That Roofed the World: Easdale, Seil, Luing and Belnahua By (author) Mary Withall. This text contains a comprehensive history of the slate industry in the west of Scotland, complete with a detailed and vivid account of the communities on the Atlantic bound islands of Easdale, Seil, Luing and Belnahua.

They are Seil, Easdale, Luing, and Belnahua. Quarry working began inand at the turn of the 20th century, the quarries were yielding eight million slates every year. Slates from the quarries on the islands of Seil, Luing, Easdale and Belnahua were exported to. The Islands that Roofed the World: Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil eBook: Withall, Mary: : Kindle Luing and Seil book.

The main islands are Seil, Easdale, Luing, Lunga, Shuna, Torsa and Belnahua and can be found roughly between Oban Easdale the north and Jura in the south.

The easiest and most used method to access the islands is from a minor road from the A south of Oban. The current population on the islands sits at around people on Seil, people on Luing, and 60 people on Easdale.

ISLE OF SEIL The Isle of Seil has been connected to the mainland by the picturesque Clachan Bridge since ; it is also known as the ‘Bridge over the Atlantic’. Belnahua is one of the "Slate Luing and Seil book which were at the heart of the Scottish slate industry.

Along with neighbouring islands of Luing, Seil and Easdale the slate quarried was used all over Scotland and there will hardly be a town anywhere which doesn't have at least one roof of Slate Islands produce.

Belnahua is nowadays uninhabited, but in earlier times was home to almost people employed in the slate quarry industry. The ruined cottages are an eerie legacy of a bygone age.

Seil. Seil, the most Northerly of the Slate Islands, is connected to the mainland by a small single-arched bridge dating from known as ‘The Bridge over the Atlantic’. The bridge is a vital link, keeping the island populated and vibrant. The Slate Islands are an island group in the Inner Hebrides, lying immediately off the west coast of Scotland, north of Jura and southwest of main islands are Seil, Easdale, Luing, Shuna, Torsa and Belnahua.

Scarba and Kerrera, which lie nearby, are not usually included. The underlying geology of the islands is Dalradian slate, which was quarried widely until the midth century.

From here you begin to understand why the islands of Seil, Easdale, Luing and Belnahua are known as the Slate Islands. The very shape of the landscape around Ellenabeich, and of Easdale Island in particular, have been transformed by an industry that lasted for centuries and which led to the term: "the islands that roofed the world".

Luing (Scottish Gaelic: Luinn) is a small island in Argyll and Bute, 16 miles south of Oban. Understand []. Once an important site of the British slate industry, Luing is one of the major 'Slate Islands'.

Situated in the Firth of Lorn, it covers an area of 1, hectares and. Isle of Luing - Isle of Seil Ferry Timetable When you travel on our ferries, although not mandatory, you may opt to wear a face covering. On the Lismore ferry all travellers will have to wear face coverings.

The island of Luing lies across the Cuan Sound to the south and beyond are Lunga and Scarba. Smaller islands surrounidng Seil are its companion Slate Islands of Easdale, Torsa, Belnahua and Shuna. Eilean Dubh Mòr is to the south-west with the Garvellachs beyond, with Insh to the north west.

: The Islands that Roofed the World: Easdale, Balnahua, Luing and Seil (): Withall, Mary: Books. Seil Island is part of the Slate Islands, together with Luing, Belnahua and Easdale Island. We have 2 pubs and a shop where you can get most things.

Oban is 13 miles away and has shops, restaurants, a cinema and last but not least, ferries to the inner and outer Hebrides/10(49). It takes just over 3 hours and is a stunning journey.

If you are bringing a bike you must book it on as there are only 6 cycle spaces and in the summer these can get booked up quickly. Bus no.

Driving. From Oban Follow the A coastal route south. After around 8 miles, take the B right turn signposted Luing and Easdale and follow the.

The Slate islands were the centre of the Scottish slate industry from the mid 18th to the mid 19th century. They are Seil, Easdale, Luing, and Belnahua. Seil is reached by the “Bridge over the Atlantic” - an attractive hump-backed year old construction, linking the Argyll to Seil, across the Sound of Clachan.

The Slate Islands of Belnahua, Easdale, Luing and Seil As the Iapetus Ocean began to close about million years ago, these sea-floor sedimentary rocks were squeezed between colliding continents. The thick layers of dark mudstone, filled with organic material and still plastic, were concertina-ed into extremely large, tight folds.

The islands from which the slate that gives rise to the name was quarried on a commercial basis are Easdale, Belnahua, Luing and Seil, as featured in the name of a recent book on the subject. The website of the Slate Islands Heritage Trust also prominently lists these islands as their remit [2] although other sources are more inclusive.Isle of Seil and the Oban Area.

Isle of Seil belongs to the “Slate Islands” Luing, Seil, Easdale and Belnahua. These islands were the centre of the Scottish Slate industry in the 18 th and 19 th Century and on all the islands we still have the tiny small village houses where the slate workers used to live.

Island hopping is one of the many things we recommend if you have time or.Belnahau is one of the four Slate Islands consisting of Seil, Easdale and Luing, heart of the Scottish slate industry for around years, exporting roof slates to all corners of the globe during the 18th and 19th centuries and a source of employment on the islands up until the ss.